The Capture of Light and Space, Photographer Danica Kus

By Danica Kus

By Danica Kus

By Danica Kus

By Danica Kus

Architecture is the art form that always surrounds us, and influences our everyday lives.  It can frustrate or inspire.  It can be mediocre or leave us breathless.

The photography of Danica Kus captures the inspiration that can be architecture.  Her photography is its own art form and we are happy to share her work with you.

By Danica Kus

By Danica Kus

By Danica Kus

By Danica Kus

Would you please tell us a little about yourself?

I’m a fine art and architectural photographer born in Slovenia, currently living in Brussels, Belgium.

How did you get started in photography?

In 1999, my husband and I moved to Brussels.  I wanted to learn more about photography since I was working in an advertising agency in Slovenia.

In Brussels I enrolled in RhoK Academy and later in Ecole des Arts d’Ixelles for photography.  Especially I was excited to working in the darkroom when the image came out of the chemicals.  That was a magic moment for me and from that time on I have been very devoted to photography.

Photography became my way of expression and my profession.

What made you chose architectural photography?

In 2006, I got a chance to work for a Slovenian architectural magazine.  My friend and architect Tanja Barle inspire me to enter the world of architecture.  For that magazine we worked together.  We were looking for an interesting contemporary house, she wrote the text and I photographed the house and then we got published.  It was a special feeling when my photographs appeared in such a nice color magazine.  For me it was a great source of new energy for my future work.

How do you divide your personal work from your work for clients?  Or do you find they both influence the other?

They both influence the other.

I photograph the buildings with the same passion when the work is either for a client or my personal work.  Each building is a unique experience for me.  I try to explore the symbolic meaning of constructed forms and create an imaginary space….

My inspiration comes from structures, material, light, darkness, rhythm…sometimes I am more concentrated on the created atmosphere of the space rather than the realistic architectural object.  My architectural photography is documentary, marked with poetic vision of the space.

 

Which photographers work do you admire?

I have been inspired by great photographers like Julia Margaret Cameron, František Drtikol, Josef Sudek, Andre Kertesz, Edward Steichen, Alfred Stieglitz, Masao Yamamoto… and many contemporary photographers.

And what about their work inspires you?

I am inspired by their originality, new vision, soft light, pictorialist style, composition, poetry, timelessness…. Their work always catches my eye.

By Danica Kus

By Danica Kus

By Danica Kus

By Danica Kus

Would you share the process you go on when you are first given an assignment?

My first assignment was for the Slovenian architectural magazine I mentioned before.

I had to photograph an interesting modernist house in Brussels, “ La Maison de Verre”.

I remember that I was pretty excited, enthusiastic and naïve.  I didn’t even have proper photo equipment for architectural photography.  Somehow I made photos, good enough for publishing.

Would you tell us about your workspace?

I work digitally, so my workspace is behind the computer.  I used to have a darkroom; unfortunately I don’t have it anymore.

How does your art affect the way you see the world?

Through my art I see the world is more emotional and fragile.  With my affection for buildings, forms and environment, I wish to evoke re-thinking or an opportunity for change.

Is there another type of photography or subject matter you would like tackle?

Mostly I photograph contemporary architecture, but one of my dreams is to photograph the Ethiopian’s underground churches, built about 10 centuries ago.  In Lalibela (named after King Lalibela) exist 11 churches that were carved from volcanic rock, each in a unique style.  I hope I could tackle this project and make a publication about it.

By Danica Kus

By Danica Kus

By Danica Kus

By Danica Kus

 

Thank you Danica for sharing your work and your words.

To learn more about the work of Danica Kus please visit her site at, Danica Kus.

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All publications may not be reproduced in part or in whole without permission of Rfotofolio and the photographer.

All rights reserved.

Coming this week . . .

What Inspires You?

Some days you just need a little Wynn Bullock

Erosion,1959 by Wynn Bullock,© Bullock Family Photography, LLC

Erosion,1959 by Wynn Bullock,© Bullock Family Photography, LLC

“I love the medium of photography, for with its unique realism it gives me the power to go beyond conventional ways of seeing and understanding and say—This is real, too.” Wynn Bullock

 

Viewpoint Photographic Art Center

Sacramento, CA.

Exhibit Dates:
Wednesday, April 8th to Saturday, May. 2nd
Artist Reception (Member Event):
Friday, April, 10th 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm
2nd Saturday Opening (General Public):
Saturday, April, 11th 5:00 pm to 9:00 pm
One of the most significant photographers of the mid-20th century, Wynn Bullock (1902-1975) worked in the American modernist tradition alongside Edward Weston, Harry Callahan and Ansel Adams. More than 50 black-and-white and color works by Bullock will come together for the exhibition at the Viewpoint Gallery.

A close friend of influential West Coast artists Ansel Adams and Edward Weston, and a contemporary of Minor White, Harry Callahan, Aaron Siskind, Imogen Cunningham and Frederick Sommer, Bullock created a body of work marked by a distinct interest in experimentation, abstraction and philosophical exploration. His images Let There Be Light and Child in Forest became icons in the history of photography following their prominent inclusion in Edward Steichen’s landmark 1955 exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art, The Family of Man.

EVENTS—PLEASE JOIN US: The exhibit will be celebrated with several activities:

April 10, 2015: Artists Reception (Member Event)
April 11: 2nd Saturday Opening (General Public)
April 18, 5 to 8 p.m.: AN ICONIC EVENT! A birthday party fundraiser celebrating Wynn Bullock in support of Viewpoint Photographic Art Center with Barbara Bullock-Wilson and Lynne Harrington-Bullock attending. The Bullock family members will be available to sign books at the event.
April 19, 2 p.m.: Lecture by Larry Gustafson Wynn Bullock and His Creative Power

To learn more about Wynn Bullock please visit the Wynn Bullock Photography. 

For more information about Viewpoint Photographic Art Center, please visit their site at Viewpoint Photographic Art Center.

 


You may also see Wynn’s amazing work

 Nature’s Mysteries: Landscape Photography by Wynn Bullock

At the SFO Museum.

Located on the departures level in the pre-security area between Terminals 2 and 3 at the San Francisco Airport, this show is accessible to the general public and available for viewing any time of the day or night through May.

For more information please visit, please visit their site at, SFO Museum.


Color Light Abstraction 1036 (1963) Wynn Bullock © Bullock Family Photography, LLC

Color Light Abstraction 1036 (1963) Wynn Bullock © Bullock Family Photography, LLC

Color Light Abstraction 1073 (1961) Wynn Bullock © Bullock Family Photography, LLC

Color Light Abstraction 1073 (1961) Wynn Bullock © Bullock Family Photography, LLC

The Lumiere Brothers Center for Photography
Bolotnaya embankment 3, bld. 1
119072 Moscow
+7 495-228 98 78

www.lumiere.ru

The Lumiere Brothers Center for Photography is pleased to present an exhibition of one of the most significant American modernist photographers of the mid-20th century. Wynn Bullock.

Wynn Bullock: Immersion is the first major exhibition of Wynn’s work in Russia. Hosted by Lumiere Brothers Center for Photography and co-sponsored by the U.S. Embassy in Moscow, this 60-print show opened with a festive reception on March 17 that included presentations by the show’s curator Anastasia Lepikhova and the U.S. Embassy’s Minister for Public Affairs Jeffrey Sexton. There was also a brief greeting from Wynn’s daughter Barbara Bullock-Wilson and her husband Gene via Skype.

 

Under Monterey Wharf   Wynn Bullock© Bullock Family Photography, LLC

Under Monterey Wharf Wynn Bullock© Bullock Family Photography, LLC

 

Thank you to the photographers that share their work with us.

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Where We Work, with Randy Efros

 

© Randy Efros

© Randy Efros

Do you have “objects of inspiration” in your work space?

I have many items in my darkroom that are important to me.  This includes lots of framed photographs of mine and a few photos, paintings and other objects done by others.  I use them as references and inspiration for myself and people I tutor.

What are some of your favorite tools? 

I have the Saunders 4550 enlarger, a couple of Durst 8×10 enlargers (including Brett’s), a few Jobos and lots of the normal darkroom needs.  I try to have spares of everything I regularly use.  A couple of my favorite items I use were Brett’s: his Kodak siphon and tacking iron, 16×20 trays, and negative brush.

© Randy Efros

© Randy Efros

© Randy Efros

© Randy Efros

If there was one thing you could change about your space what would it be?
My darkroom works well for me but I do wish it was a little bit bigger!

Is the work you do in the darkroom as important to you as what you do behind the camera?

I would always prefer to be out traveling and photographing but the darkroom is such a magical place where your vision in the field is fully realized.

What advice would you give to someone who is thinking about setting up a darkroom for the first time?

If someone is thinking of making a darkroom they would be wise to visit as many working darkrooms as possible, even taking darkroom tutorials or workshops if they are able.

Thank you Randy for sharing your work space with us.

To learn more about Randy Efros please visit his site at Randy Efros.

To learn more about Brett Weston please visit, Brett Weston Archive.

To read our interview with Randy please visit, Any Day Spent Photographing is a Good Day.


 

© Randy Efros

© Randy Efros

Thank you to the photographers that share their work with us.

rfotofolio

All publications may not be reproduced in part or in whole without permission of Rfotofolio and the photographer.

All rights reserved.

Art is About Action,Photographer Marco Lorenzetti

 

Youth and Beauty © Marco Lorenzetti

Youth and Beauty © Marco Lorenzetti

Rfotofolio is pleased to share the work and words of photographer Marco Lorenzetti.  In our last call for submissions we ask for photographers to submit work that inspired them.  Marco was one of our Merit winners.

Please tell us about yourself.

I’m a social documentary photographer/artist.  My medium is large format traditional black and white photography.  I use an 8×10 Deardorff handmade in Chicago, Tri-x film and a few lenses.  In addition to being a photographer, I’m a print maker.  I believe in the print as artifact.

How did you get started photography?

I started to make pictures while attending the University of Michigan School of Art.

Which photographers and other artists’ work do you admire?

I admire Julia Margaret Cameron for her use of beauty.  Jacob Riis, for using the camera as a weapon of change.  August Sander for his scope and demonstrating that the more specific you are with your subject matter, the more open and accessible the idea becomes.  Arbus, for her truthfulness, even when she lied.  Walker Evans for his dogmatism.  Larry Fink for his awkward grace,   Ken Josephson and Barbra Crane for their Chicago School influence that included Callahan, Siskind, and Sinsabaugh.  I love the writing of Flannery O’Connor and Faulkner, the painting of Bacon and Francesco Clemente, the film of Bergman.

Would you share with us an image (not your own) that has stayed with you over time.

I was with Professor Phil Davis at The University of Michigan School of Art.  One day, after lunch in his office, he brought out a photograph by August Sander, The Boxers. It was printed by Sander’s son and it was amazing.  I had never seen skin, fabric, a wall, described with such undeniable clarity and intent.

Is there one thing that you wish people would stop doing when it comes to the creative process or in the art world?

I stand, steadfastly, in defense of traditional picture making.
Setting parameters is crucial to being productive.  By limiting the process, it’s actually freeing.
The problem I have with photo illustration is that anything is possible.  Anything isn’t possible.  In photography, the only thing that is possible is that which happens before the lens, otherwise the everyday is void of mystery.  Also, lets clarify, vague is not mysterious. Vague is unclear in meaning, approximate, ill-defined or imprecise and unfocused.  It was, perhaps Lisette Model who said, “The most mysterious fact is one clearly stated.”  I think she said that to Arbus.  I admire old processes and montage, but if the pictures are process driven, they have limited reach for me . . . . I’m interested in mystery, not decoration. The print has to disappear, it must evaporate into the idea or feeling.


 

We Meet Again in Heaven @ Marco Lorenzetti

We Meet Again in Heaven @ Marco Lorenzetti

The Rosebud  @ Marco Lorenzetti

The Rosebud @ Marco Lorenzetti

What challenges do you face as an artist?

If a picture is both real and in the past, simultaneously, as soon as the shutter is
closed, how do I make it a permanent part of our present?

How do you view this time in the history of photography?

It’s the same for all generations.  We have the same set of problems, the same challenges in human relationships, in art, and in society.  This time in photography is not more remarkable than any other.  It’s what we can accomplish that marks our time as meaningful.  The medium, my tools, remain unchanged.  There is no reason to alter my process.  The finest way to render a black and white image is film then paper, where the image lives permanently inside of silver emulsion with unparalleled depth and clarity. There, the lights rays that travelled in a straight line through the lens are reflected back to us through a completely unique viewing experience.  Photography is a process of light, it is the benchmark, not a digital approximation.  I want to exploit the power of the medium, not bury it.

How do you over come a creative block? 

Art is about action.   This is especially true with picture making, the action of the shutter in the lens, the action of the light to the film and the chemicals to the paper.  With parameters, work becomes obvious, routine.  When you have a way of working, consistency with your materials, your rational brain can de-activate, making room for intuition and happenstance.  It then becomes a matter of knowing, or not knowing, what you have discovered.

What do you hope the viewer takes from your images? 

That’s something only they can know.

Thank you Marco we look forward to seeing more of your work.

To learn more about the work of Marco Lorenzetti please visit his site at Marco Lorenzetti.

 

Jacobs Ladder © Marco Lorenzetti

Jacobs Ladder © Marco Lorenzetti

Thank you to the photographers that share their work with us.

rfotofolio

All publications may not be reproduced in part or in whole without permission of Rfotofolio and the photographer.

All rights reserved.

S. Gayle Stevens Disappearance: Another Silent Spring

 

Through My Looking Glass © S.Gayle Stevens

Through My Looking Glass © S.Gayle Stevens

 

From the Catherine Couturier Gallery

March 28 – April 25, 2015
Opening Reception with the artist: Saturday, March 28, 2-5p.m.
Artist Talk, 3:45p.m.

Disappearance: Another Silent Spring

In 1962 Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring was published, the title referring to the silence of the birds due to DDT; this groundbreaking book led to the creation of the EPA.  In 2014 pesticides and loss of habitat are endangering our pollinators and our bird population again.  This concern is the inspiration for this science-based work from 2014.

Disappearance: Another Silent Spring is a series of installation pieces; camera-less wet plate collodion tintypes, the plates represent shadows of the past.  Flight inspired by the work of Etienne Jules Marey, depicts a pelican in flight.  The symbol of Louisiana, the brown pelican, fights habitat loss due to the decimation of thousands of acres of coastal land for pipelines as well as the consequences from the oil spill.  Clearing deals with the issues of habitat loss. In Disappearance I have created two bodies of work; wet plate tintype photograms of individual bees (displayed as one hundred, two by two-inch plates and an equal number of live flowering plants) and mammoth plate tintype photograms (twenty inch by twenty inch plates) with large quantities of dead honeybees. The photogram silhouettes are shadows of bees that once lived, and the large plates show the enormity of the issue, Colony Collapse Disorder.  The purpose is to create greater awareness of the problem.  Whenever possible, I work with local apiarists, having them speak on CCD and the importance of our pollinators.  Ten percent of the sales are donated to these local apiarists.  CCD, which has been affecting hives since 2005, is devastating our pollinators.  The causes are numerous including habitat loss, mites, and pesticides. 100% of the commercial almond crop in the U.S. is grown in California.  The almonds are pollinated by mobile beehives, as are many crops.  The loss of hives drives up the cost of pollination; this loss will have a decimating effect on our economy and our food supply.  Other crops dependent on bees that could disappear are: apples, blueberries, cherries, avocados, cotton, oranges, grapefruit, cucumbers, etc… a nearly endless list.
“You can thank the Apis mellifera, better known as the Western honeybee, for one  in every three mouthfuls you’ll eat today… As our farms become monocultures of commodity crops like wheat and corn – plants that provide little pollen for foraging bees – honeybees are literally starving to death.  If we don’t do something, there may not be enough honeybees to meet the pollination demands for valuable crops.  But more than that, in a world where up to 100,000 species go extinct each year, the vanishing honeybee could be the herald of a permanently diminished planet.”

                                                                                                          Time Magazine The Plight of the Honeybee

My intention is two-fold; by purchasing a tintype of an individual bee-which is priced inexpensively anyone can actively participate in Disappearance, (by making the bees disappear during the course of the exhibition) bringing awareness to the problem, and also broadening the collector base for original art. With the larger plates depicting thousands of bees, the enormity of the problem is apparent. I hope we have not recreated the environmental concerns of Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring. S. Gayle Stevens

“We stand now where two roads diverge. But unlike the roads in Robert Frost’s familiar poem, they are not equally fair. The road we have long been traveling is deceptively easy, a smooth superhighway on which we progress with great speed, but at its end lies disaster. The other fork of the road – the one less traveled by – offers our last, our only chance to reach a destination that assures the preservation of the earth.”

Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring

Disappearance: Another Silent Spring consists of multiple bodies of work, which may vary in installation size.  They may be shown in their entirety or each individual work can be displayed alone.  Disappearance small bee plates are an interactive installation of 100-400 bees.

 

To learn more about the work of S.Gayle Stevens please visit her site at, S.Gayle Stevens.

For more information about the Catherine Couturier Gallery please visit their site at,Catherine Couturier Gallery.

To learn about Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring please visit The Life and Legacy of Rachel Carson.

 

Thank you to the photographers that share their work with us.

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