In Remembrance

“And when great souls die,
after a period peace blooms,
slowly and always
irregularly. Spaces fill
with a kind of
soothing electric vibration.
Our senses, restored, never
to be the same, whisper to us.
They existed. They existed.
We can be. Be and be
better. For they existed.”

Maya Angelou

Utopia 7 © Jennifer Schlesinger Hanson

Utopia 7 © Jennifer Schlesinger

Rose Garden © J.Rosnthal

Rose Garden © J.Rosenthal

Utopia © Jennifer Hanson

Utopia © Jennifer Schlesinger

To learn more about Jennifer Schlesinger please visit her site at, Jennifer Schlesinger.

To learn more about J.Rosenthal please visit, J.Rosenthal Gallery.

rfotofolio.org

Call for Submissions: ONE

Sapling in Snow © Alan Ross

Sapling in Snow © Alan Ross

One

This call for submissions was inspired by the words of Aline Smithson.

” I do think it’s time we reconsider the idea that everything has to be created around a project twenty images wrapped up in a neat bow with an artist statement on top.  Projects are great, but what about all the single images we shoot that have no home and get over looked because they are not in that portfolio gift box? ” 

Pink Feathers ©Aline Smithson

Pink Feathers ©Aline Smithson

We are asking you send us that one image that does not belong to a series.

One image that you can’t assign to a group but that has meaning to you.

Here is your chance to break out of the portfolio box.

We are honored to have Susan Spiritus of the Susan Spiritus Gallery as our co-juror.

Susan Spiritus has been a leader in the field of fine art photography for 39 years, opening the doors to her Southern California gallery in 1976 so that she could share her passion for photography with others.

The Susan Spiritus Gallery has been actively involved in the participation of PhotoLa, Los Angeles Art Show, Festival of Books and the BTB International Contemporary Art Fair.

She has also reviewed portfolios for Review LA & Santa Fe, Photolucida, PhotoNola, Palm Springs Photo Festival and MOPLA’s Fresh Look. To read more about an article that Susan wrote for us on collecting please visit, Thoughts from Susan Spiritus.

To learn more about the Susan Spiritus please visit her site, at the Susan Spiritus Gallery.

Important Dates:

Deadline: June 16th.

Email notifications will be sent to finalist June 30th.

Announcement on Rfotofolio

Juror’s Award

  • Online interview and exhibition on rfotofolio.org with a link to your site
  • Consideration for future publications.
  • Consideration for group show, time and place to be announced.

Rfotofolio Award

When a photographer sees an image that makes an impression on them, you will often hear it said, ” That is an image I wish I would have taken. “We are looking for photographs that “raise the bar”.

  • Online interview and exhibition on rfotofolio.org with a link to your site
  • Consideration for future publications.
  • Consideration for group show, time and place to be announced.

Merit awards will be chosen by Susan Spiritus and Rfotofolio.

Click here for more information on how to submit your image.

rfotofolio

To learn more about photographer Alan Ross, please visit his site at, Alan Ross Photography.

 To learn more about Aline Smithson please visit her site, Aline Smithson.

Thank you to the photographers that share their work with us.

What will you create?

Dancer © Diana Bloomfield

Dancer © Diana Bloomfield

Everyday is a gift. Make it count.

Color Light Abstraction,1075 (Early   1960's)Wynn Bullock© Bullock Family Photography, LLC

Color Light Abstraction,1075 (Early 1960’s)Wynn Bullock© Bullock Family Photography, LLC

Yellowstone River © Jack Spencer

Yellowstone River © Jack Spencer

Bayou Boy © Tami Bone

Bayou Boy © Tami Bone

To learn more about these photographers please visit their sites by clicking on their names.

Diana Bloomfield

Wynn Bullock

Jack Spencer

Tami Bone

Thank you to the photographers that share their work with us.

rfotofolio.org

 

 

A Life Full of Grace, Photographer Edna Bullock

On a memorable Saturday afternoon a few months ago, my eyes were opened to a special artist.  While there was only time to view a few of her photographs, her spirit so filled each print I could feel the artist presence in each one.  Every image suggested movement and harmony.  In some, there was an added sparkle of lively humor; in others a nurturing embrace.

Edna Bullock became an ’emerging’ artist in photography at age 61.  As a dancer in her youth, she was inspired by Isadora Duncan, Martha Graham, and Ruth St. Denis.  She also enjoyed the comic side of dance and developed her own style of light-hearted tap.  From the early 1940s to the mid-1970s, she spent her time as a choreographer, physical education and home economics teacher, wife, and mother. In her home life, she made clothing for her family, including men’s shirts, overcoats, and evening gowns. Some articles are still being worn with loving appreciation for the skill and attention to detail that are evident in every long-lasting stitch.  Other handcrafts such as macramé, needlework, were also ways of expression as were flower gardening, drawing, woodblock art, and calligraphy.  Creativity was part of her everyday life.

Edna Bullock by Wynn Bullock

Edna Bullock by Wynn Bullock ©  Bullock Family Photography LLC.

With her husband Wynn and their two daughters Barbara and Lynne, Edna’s home-base was the Monterey Peninsula, just fifty miles west of the small farming community of Hollister where she was born in 1915.  The Peninsula was a great center for photography as well as a wide spectrum of other arts.  Ansel and Virginia Adams, Morley and Frances Baer, and several members of the Weston family were among Wynn’s and Edna’s circle of friends as well as poet Eric Barker, publisher and painter Emil White, writer Henry Miller, and sculptor Gordon Newell.  It was a lively, generous community, sharing support, encouragement, and appreciation.  Sitting in on their conversations must have been its own form of master class.

After Wynn passed away in 1975 and her children were grown and on their own paths, Edna wondered about her future.  Healthy, and energetic, she knew she didn’t want to go back to teaching, and she surprised her family by deciding to pursue photography herself.  With a darkroom full of supplies, one of Wynn’s cameras, and over thirty years of being the wife of Wynn’s, she felt she had nothing to lose by giving it a try.  Not knowing anything about the technical side of photography, she enrolled in Photography I at her local community college where the teacher, Henry Gilpin was astonished to see her as one of his students.

Once she started on this course, Edna, in her usual fashion, moved full speed ahead, going remarkably quickly from taking classes and workshops, to teaching them.  Starting a whole new career at 61 meant there was no time to waste.

Edna Bullock, Lillie, 1976 © 1976/2012 Bullock Family Photography LLC.  All rights reserved.

Edna Bullock, Lillie, 1976 © 1976/2012 Bullock Family Photography LLC. All rights reserved..

Every time she went into the darkroom, Edna wore one of the shirts she had made for Wynn, along with his favorite work belt.  A source of comfort, it was also a ritual that she believed challenged her to do her best.  Even though she had lived with one of the great photographers of the mid-twentieth century and had been surrounded by other photographic giants, Edna managed to find her own voice in her photographs. Peace, rhythm, humor, curiosity, and connection are all there in her images.  Although her archive contains photographs of a wide range of subject matter, including landscapes, seascapes, flea markets, and portraits, she is perhaps best known for her nudes.

Three Nudes on the Dune by Edna Bullock © Bullock Family Photography LLC

Three Nudes on the Dune by Edna Bullock © Bullock Family Photography LLC

In these images, Edna portrays men as well as women comfortable in their own bodies and in tune with nature.   She had a wonderful ability to develop respectful and creatively rich relationships with her models and this kind of collaboration produced a remarkable body of work.

Rfotofolio wishes to thank Barbara and Gene Bullock-Wilson for their time and support in sharing information and materials, as well as, their efforts in preserving the Bullock family photographic legacies.  We also wish to thank the estate for giving us permission to make these photographs available on our site.

Peggy and Round Rocks 1991, Edna Bullock © Bullock Family Photography, LLC

Peggy and Round Rocks 1991, Edna Bullock © Bullock Family Photography, LLC

Lone Oak 1985 Edna Bullock ©Bullock Family PhotographyLLC

Lone Oak 1985 Edna Bullock ©Bullock Family Photography LLC

To learn more please visit, Wynn Bullock Photography. 

rfotofolio

All publications and images may not be reproduced in part or in whole without permission of Rfotofolio and the photographer.

All rights reserved.

Announcements

Weston Scholarship

Weston Scholarship

The Weston Scholarship makes a difference in the lives of young photographers. These young people are students of the darkroom arts and are passionate about photography.  If you are unable to attend, you may make a donation via the Weston Scholarship website.

To learn more about the Weston Scholarship please visit, The Weston Scholarship.

Kim and Gina © J.Rosenthal

Kim and Gina © J.Rosenthal

rfotofolio.org

Thank you to the photographers that share their work with us.

Kurt Fishback Gallery

Ruth Bernhard © Kurt Fishback

Ruth Bernhard © Kurt Fishback

“A portrait! What could be more simple and more complex, more obvious and more profound.” Charles Baudelaire

To read our interview with Kurt Fishback please visit, Photographer Kurt Fishback .

To learn more about Kurt Fishback please visit his site, Fishback Photography. 

Photographer, Kurt Fishback

Edna in Home Studio by Kurt Fishback, 1980

Edna in Home Studio by Kurt Fishback, 1980

Rfotofolio is pleased to share the work of photographer Kurt Fishback. He was brought to our attention when we published this portrait of Edna Bullock.  Thank you Kurt for sharing your work with us.

How did you get started in photography?

I was born into photography.  My father, Glen Fishback, was a photographer and the first photograph of me he used for an ad in 1942 was when I was ten days old.  Besides running a portrait and wedding studio in Sacramento, CA into the 1950’s, he made human interest photos of me and my sister for ads for Kodak, Rolleiflex, and other companies.  Also, near the day I was born I received a letter from Edward Weston from whom I received my middle name sharing his pride of this event.

I wanted to be an architect and when time came to go to college in 1961 I didn’t want to do calculus.  That is when I began making my own photographs.  Since there were no college art departments that I could find with photography as one of the mediums on the West Coast I gravitated to ceramics.  By 1970, when I got my MFA at UC Davis in sculpture I had been making documentary photographs of people in the street but gained a higher visibility in ceramics as part of the Funk Art movement in California.

In 1973, while teaching painting, drawing, design, and art history at College of the Siskiyous in Weed, CA my father asked me to teach with him at his school of photography in Sacramento, CA.  This completed my shift almost full-time to photography as my primary medium.

In 1979, after my father’s death in 1976, I left the school and opened a commercial photography studio in Sacramento.  I also began making portraits of artists the same year.

 

Joy Bertinuson © Kurt Fishback

Joy Bertinuson © Kurt Fishback

Did you have a mentor?

Aside from growing up around Edward Weston, Ansel Adams, and Wynn Bullock my mentor and teacher was my father Glen Fishback.  I took one class in photography at Sacramento City College in 1962 and flunked it. Their darkrooms were dirty and the chemistry was never fresh so I asked politely if I could work in my Dad’s darkroom.  The teacher took offense and that ended my training in photography in college.  My Dad taught me how to make the “fine black and white print”.  Then all of my experience as a child in and around photography came together and made sense personally.

 

Sandra Shannonhouse © Kurt Fishback

Sandra Shannonhouse © Kurt Fishback

Vickie Jo Sowell © Kurt Fishback

Vickie Jo Sowell © Kurt Fishback

What inspired you to do the Women Artists series?

In August, 2013 an exhibition of my portraits at Pence Gallery in Davis, CA hosted a gallery talk with me.  A woman there asked me in a rather angry tone why there were not more women artist portraits in the show.  I thought for a moment and shared that history had not be nearly as fair to women artists in opportunity.  When I began making portraits of artists in 1979 it was all about sharing artists with the public in a personal, revealing way.  I have done that and followed the level of acceptance and appreciation in a world that has left women begging for equal time and an eye for their work.  And, in part, I was searching for the “most famous” which were of course predominantly men.  Even so, I have made over seventy portraits of women artists out of more than two hundred and fifty.  For example, when I was given a list in 1980 by the then curator at the Crocker Art Museum of 128 artists from which I could choose 35 to photograph and exhibit in 1981, there existed a ratio of 30% women to 70% men suggested as worthy of inclusion.  That is how things were and not enough has changed.

While my reasons for making new portraits of women artists is to bring my archive into gender parity were important, something else emerged of a both rare and very personally gratifying nature portrait by portrait, experience by experience.  This turned out to be the real reason I was guided to begin this project.
In practice, each time I make art in the portrait manner I both collaborate and partner with another human being. Working with women artists exclusively has helped to raise my understanding immeasurably as to their concerns through the years on gender equity in all things and not just their places in the world of art.
This has given me an opportunity to practice compassion and empathy in a way I might never have before this project presented itself.  In recording each artist with concern for every detail shared, the portraits act in a very positive way to portray them in the very best light and share who they are with the public.

These women’s stories are what have taught me that this project is not just important to me but of inestimable value to them and I believe for the entire American culture.  A sense of community has begun to emerge in some cases where it didn’t before and has strengthened alliances already in place.

Was there a woman photographer that had an influence on your work?  Is there a story you would like to share with our readers?

Ironically, the woman photographer who influenced me the most was Edna Bullock who your recent article was all about.  That is one of the reasons I was so honored that my photos were used.  Edna shared her wisdom with me a number of times.  Her portrait, the one with her looking into the camera, I count as my most successful portrait.  I learned the following from her daughter Barbara Bullock Wilson shortly before her death.

Edna had a few strokes late in her life.  In each case while convalescing at home under her daughters’ care, this portrait was placed above her bed to remind all who visited about her wonderful, loving smile.  Then it was also used at the altar in the church where her memorial service was held in Carmel.  Barbara asked me later how much it would cost for four prints for her and her sisters.  I sent them as a gift considering the wonderful effect my portrait of Edna had on that whole experience.

Also, Ruth Bernhard had a profound effect on me.  I tried for six months to get Ruth to let me make her portrait. When she finally agreed she explained that she was a sixteen year old girl trapped in a seventy-six year old body.  After she saw the results of our first session, she invited me back to do it again.  This time we worked in the studio where she did all of her own work.  What followed was a wonderful collaboration and lesson for me in the use of available light.

I retouched the print a great deal as Ruth preferred soft, flattering portraits.  When she saw it she exclaimed, “When I go to the plastic surgeon, I will take this portrait with me.”

I felt the first visit was magical.  While I was making the portrait, Ruth looked at me and said, with a twinkle’ in her eye, ” I love looking at your eyes over the top of the camera.”  On the next visit I showed Ruth the portrait and she said, ” Well! it’s what I look like, I keep hoping to look different, but I always look the same.  My inner self is not in tune with my outer countenance.  There is a sixteen year old girl trapped in here.”

Ruth sees things others do not see, things most people either take for granted, or overlook as unimportant.  For example, Ruth dug around in a small dish full of miniature shells and found a pink speck and handed me a magnifying glass.  Under magnification I could see a beautiful, perfectly formed shell.  “I found this shell with my naked eye on a beach where people told me there were no shells.  Well, there were millions of shells, only they were so small, people were walking on them and couldn’t distinguish them from particles of sand.  I guess my eye sight is still pretty good”.

I pay much closer attention to details thanks to her.

Ruth Bernhard © Kurt Fishback

Ruth Bernhard © Kurt Fishback

What do you love most about photography?

What I love the most about photography is how it captures light in such a special way.  Black and White is my choice of capture now and while my Dad opened my eyes to good printmaking, it was Ansel Adams that gave me the axiom for it all.

I visited Ansel in his home shortly after my Dad died in 1976.  I wanted to re-connect with my roots in Carmel. While we talked about things technical and historical, light came up and Ansel asked me to follow him.  We walked through his house and into a back room to a large bay window.  He pointed out a huge pine tree with limbs hanging nearly to the ground.  He said, “look back under that tree, under the branches”.  It seemed very dark under the tree.  Then he said, “there’s light there”.  In a class I was teaching at a college in Sacramento I wrote this axiom on the board the first day of class and we searched for its meaning the rest of the semester.
I also love the opportunities it affords me for nurturing old and gaining new relationships with other human beings.

Thank you Kurt for sharing your work and words.

Cassandra Reeves © Kurt Fishback

Cassandra Reeves © Kurt Fishback

 To learn more about Kurt Fishback please visit his site at, Kurt Fishback.

To learn more about these artist just click on their names.

Cassandra Reeves

Edna Bullock 

Judy Dater

Ruth Bernhard

Vickie Jo Sowell

Sandra Shannonhouse

rfotofolio

All publications and images may not be reproduced in part or in whole without permission of Rfotofolio and the photographer.

All rights reserved.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 3,999 other followers